Online Now 1255

LHR pres My Chihuahua Bites Salsa

Longhorn Round-Up presented by My Chihuahua Bites Salsa with Hookem.com is back again in this bi-weekly podcast.

In this episode of the Longhorn Round-Up the guys break down Texas' 21-17 win over the Kansas Jayhawks.

The team of Hookem.com's Jeff Howe, Austin radio veteran Matt Butler and lifetime Longhorn, six-year NFL veteran and current sideline reporter for Texas Longhorns football Rod Babers take Longhorn fans through more than an hour of nothing but Longhorn football talk.

In this Thursday episode, the guys review Texas’ ugly 17-14 victory over the Kansas Jayhawks, and share their opinions about what they think is causing the struggles with the Texas football team. The guys continue to discuss what they think is the root of the problem with the Texas defense. They also go in depth about the Texas offense and discuss what they think is the most efficient way for the Longhorns to be most successful on offense.

As always, there are ten hard-hitting questions in “The Blitz”, all of which focus the Longhorns match-up against Kansas.

Plus, in this episode's edition of “Hearing from the Horns”, you will get to hear head coach Mack Brown, defensive coordinator Manny Diaz, offensive coordinator Bryan Harsin, and senior safety Kenny Vaccaro talk about their team after the victory on Saturday.

Longhorn Round-Up presented by My Chihuahua Bites Salsa (63:28)

0:18 – Calls of the week from the Voice of the Longhorns, Craig Way – Part I
3:33 – Initial thoughts from the Kansas game

Segment 1: Gridiron Talk presented by Callahan's General Store (11:17)
11:23 – Calls of the week from the Voice of the Longhorns, Craig Way – Part II
12:28 – What disappointed Jeff so much about the game against Kansas
13:35 – What Rod observed from the Texas players when he was on the field during pre-game warm-ups
16:25 – The guys diagnose what they think is the root of Texas’ problems
19:28 – Inside the numbers: Kansas rushing and third downs
22:41 – Rod gives his opinion on the Texas defense
24:24 – Jeff on what frustrates Texas fans about this season
26:49 – Hearing from the Horns....Mack Brown on one key component that allowed Texas to come back to beat Kansas
27:21 – Hearing from the Horns....Manny Diaz on what the defense began to do well against Kansas
28:30 – Hearing from the Horns....Kenny Vaccaro on how the defense improved during the Kansas game
29:01 – Hearing from the Horns....Bryan Harsin on why he benched David Ash
29:51 – Hearing from the Horns....Bryan Harsin on if they will start Case McCoy on Saturday in Lubbock
30:43 – On where this Texas team is this season compared to last season’s team
34:35 – Matt gives his analysis on the problems on offense against Kansas game
35:48 – More talk about the Texas offense, and the style of offense that Texas should identify with
39:33 – On Texas’ physicality as a team
41:30 – On Daje Johnson, D.J. Monroe and Marquise Goodwin’s numbers since the Oklahoma State game
42:12 – On the Texas running backs
44:20 – On the 2012 Texas football team at this point in the season
46:48 – What Texas’ defense could really use this season
48:00 – On the players that stood out on the defensive side for Texas against Kansas

Segment 2: The Blitz (53:06)
53:30 – Other than the last two touchdown drives, was Johnathan Gray’s performance the most impressive aspect of the Texas offense?
53:57 – Did Bryan Harsin make the right call by benching David Ash?
54:21 – Describe Texas being stopped on 4th-and-goal by Kansas in one word
54:48 – Describe the 98-yard touchdown drive by Kansas in one word
55:06 – Who is the most valuable wide receiver on the Texas team?
55:42 – Is Alex Okafor the best defensive end in the Big 12?
55:59 – Are you pleasantly surprised with the Texas tight end position?
56:30 – What is more mind-numbing, James Sims becoming the fifth straight running back to have a career game against Texas this season or Marquise Goodwin and D.J. Monroe having to wait until a few minutes into the fourth quarter to get their first touches of the game?
57:22 – What grade would you give the Texas offensive line?
59:20 – Was Kansas’ field goal drive to take a 17-14 lead the most frustrating drive of the season?

Segment 3: Overtime (60:26)
60:25 – Bennie Wylie's inspiration for “Overtime”
60:42 – Jeff's "Overtime" on the Texas football program
62:10 – The Next Episode”

Listen to the Longhorn Round-Up here

  • Longhorn Round-Up presented by My Chihuahua Bites Salsa (63:28)

    0:18 – Calls of the week from the Voice of the Longhorns, Craig Way – Part I
    3:33 – Initial thoughts from the Kansas game

    Segment 1: Gridiron Talk presented by Callahan's General Store (11:17)
    11:23 – Calls of the week from the Voice of the Longhorns, Craig Way – Part II
    12:28 – What disappointed Jeff so much about the game against Kansas
    13:35 – What Rod observed from the Texas players when he was on the field during pre-game warm-ups
    16:25 – The guys diagnose what they think is the root of Texas’ problems
    19:28 – Inside the numbers: Kansas rushing and third downs
    22:41 – Rod gives his opinion on the Texas defense
    24:24 – Jeff on what frustrates Texas fans about this season
    26:49 – Hearing from the Horns....Mack Brown on one key component that allowed Texas to come back to beat Kansas
    27:21 – Hearing from the Horns....Manny Diaz on what the defense began to do well against Kansas
    28:30 – Hearing from the Horns....Kenny Vaccaro on how the defense improved during the Kansas game
    29:01 – Hearing from the Horns....Bryan Harsin on why he benched David Ash
    29:51 – Hearing from the Horns....Bryan Harsin on if they will start Case McCoy on Saturday in Lubbock
    30:43 – On where this Texas team is this season compared to last season’s team
    34:35 – Matt gives his analysis on the problems on offense against Kansas game
    35:48 – More talk about the Texas offense, and the style of offense that Texas should identify with
    39:33 – On Texas’ physicality as a team
    41:30 – On Daje Johnson, D.J. Monroe and Marquise Goodwin’s numbers since the Oklahoma State game
    42:12 – On the Texas running backs
    44:20 – On the 2012 Texas football team at this point in the season
    46:48 – What Texas’ defense could really use this season
    48:00 – On the players that stood out on the defensive side for Texas against Kansas

    Segment 2: The Blitz (53:06)
    53:30 – Other than the last two touchdown drives, was Johnathan Gray’s performance the most impressive aspect of the Texas offense?
    53:57 – Did Bryan Harsin make the right call by benching David Ash?
    54:21 – Describe Texas being stopped on 4th-and-goal by Kansas in one word
    54:48 – Describe the 98-yard touchdown drive by Kansas in one word
    55:06 – Who is the most valuable wide receiver on the Texas team?
    55:42 – Is Alex Okafor the best defensive end in the Big 12?
    55:59 – Are you pleasantly surprised with the Texas tight end position?
    56:30 – What is more mind-numbing, James Sims becoming the fifth straight running back to have a career game against Texas this season or Marquise Goodwin and D.J. Monroe having to wait until a few minutes into the fourth quarter to get their first touches of the game?
    57:22 – What grade would you give the Texas offensive line?
    59:20 – Was Kansas’ field goal drive to take a 17-14 lead the most frustrating drive of the season?

    Segment 3: Overtime (60:26)
    60:25 – Bennie Wylie's inspiration for “Overtime”
    60:42 – Jeff's “Overtime” on the Texas football program
    62:10 – The Next Episode”

    signature image signature image
  • Inside the numbers.... Texas' defense against the run

    First quarter - Eleven rushes for fifty-seven yards (sack yards not included), two-for-five passing for twenty-one yards, two sacks for -23 yards-- Quandre Diggs' thirteen yard sack, Tevin Jackson's ten yard sack, and a bad snap that resulted in a team loss of 16 yards.

    - Also, the incompletion at the 28-second mark of the first quarter was the final pass attempted until the 5:48 mark of the fourth quarter. That means that Kansas strictly ran the ball over and over again for almost fourty minutes of a 60-minute game.

    Second quarter - 18 rushes for 169 yards and two touchdowns
    - The first drive of the quarter took only five rushes for ninety-eight yards, the second drive was a seven play, all of which were rushes, for sixty-three yards and a touchdown.

    - Texas' defense began to play very well against the run after the first two drives of the second quarter. The third series was was three and out where Kansas lost two yards and the last series had three rushes go for ten yards when the first half ended.

    The turning point .... Texas' defense had allowed 218 yards and two touchdowns on twenty-three carries at the 7:16 mark of the second quarter, That is a ton of yards in a short amount of time. But Texas' defense did a great job from that point forward.

    - Kansas' last twenty-nine rushes went for only sixty-five yards. In overall second half numbers, Kansas had fifty-seven rushing yards on twenty-three carries while gaining only eighteen yards on one completion out of four attempts.

    - Kansas' first drive netted four yards on three rushes. Their second drive consisted of nine rushes for only twenty-five yards.

    - It took until Texas had tied the game and Kansas was facing a third and long situation before they chose to throw the ball for the first time since the first quarter, The first attempt does not even go into the box score, except in the penalty category, because Texas was called for an obvious pass interference on a deep ball thrown on third and nine. Kansas then threw again on third and eight for an eighteen-yard completion before three straight incompletions to end the game. The first incompletion was a huge play because it forced Kansas to kick a field goal to take only a 17-14 lead.

    Texas' third down defense...

    Kansas started 0/4 on third downs (Coincidentally, Baylor started 0/8)
    - 3rd and 23 -- No gain on a rush
    - 3rd and 2 -- Incompletion
    - 3rd and Goal at the 19 -- Tevin Jackson's 10 yard sack
    - 3rd and 1 -- Incompletion

    Luckily for Texas, it took Kansas a few series to realize they should be running the ball on third down no matter what the down and distance they are facing.

    Kansas was 7/10 on their next ten third down situations and they obviously had changed their strategy.

    Conversions....
    - 3rd and 11 -- 15 yard touchdown rush
    - 3rd and 3 -- 3 yard rush
    - 3rd and 5 -- 5 yard rush
    - 3rd and 6 -- 7 yard rush
    - 3rd and 3 -- 5 yard rush
    - 3rd and 2 -- 2 yard rush
    - 3rd and 8 -- 18 yard completion

    Stops...
    - 3rd and 9 -- minus-3 yard rush
    - 3rd and 7 -- 1 yard rush
    - 3rd and 5 -- minus-3 yard rush
    - 3rd and 5 -- incompletion**

    ** This was the third down before Kansas kicked the field goal to take a 17-14 lead. I am surprised that they chose to pass in this situation. Obviously, rushing the ball on third down had been working, even when the Texas defense stiffened against the run in the second half. To Kansas' credit, Michael Cumming had completed his only of the second half on that drive on a third and eight situation).

    Kansas was also one-for-two on fourth down. They converted a fourth and two with a three yard rush. They also failed to convert on fourth and goal from the twenty-nine yard on an incomplete pass.

    I was a bit befuddled with the offensive attack in the first half after the first two series. Here are the first two Texas possesions.

    - Texas' first drive was four rushing plays for 43 yards (Gray 31, Gray 5, Bergeron 4, Bergeron 3TD)
    - Texas' second drive started off well (3 rushes for 15 yards with a 12 yard pass sandwiched in there), but then a holding penalty put Texas behind the chains and forced obvious passing downs.

    The next four series is when Texas did nothing offensively.

    - The third series started with a pass that ended up as a sack, followed by an incompletion and then a one yard completion on fourth and eighteen.

    - The fourth series began with a one yard rush, followed by a four yard completion and then an incompletion.

    - The fifth series had completions on back-to-back plays, a seven-yard rush, a 15-yard illgeal hand to the face call on Texas followed by a completion and an incompletion. (Not in a hurry-up situation either, there was 7:16 left in the second quarter when Texas got the ball).

    - The last drive Texas ran the ball with Johnathan Gray for eight yards and David Ash for eight yards to get to the Kansas thirty-two yard line. Texas still had 1:34 left on the clock with all three timeouts and the clock stopped from getting a first down, but instead of running the ball and getting the ball on the edge with your speed guys (about to get to that in a second), you choose to continue to throw the ball after being continuously unsuccessful at doing all day to that point.

    Where are the touches for the speed guys?

    D.J. Monroe didn't touch the ball until the 12:25 mark of the fourth quarter when he had an eleven yard rush on a second and seven play on Case McCoy's first drive. It was his only touch of the game

    Marquise Goodwin had to wait even later to touch the ball. His first touch came at 11:25 mark of the fourth quarter when he went for 41 yards to help spark Texas' comeback. His only other touch was his 11-yard touchdown run.

    Daje Johnson had only two touches all game. He had a two yard run in the first quarter and a four yard reception in the second quarter.

    So with all of that said, after the first drive it looks like our offensive plan was to attack Kansas by throwing the ball and mixing in some runs with Joe Bergeron on first down.

    I can't believe Texas didn't try to get the ball into the hands of our most explosive offensive weapons. I would think that Texas' biggest advantage against Kansas would be our speed, especially with the trio of players that I mentioned.

    Here are the numbers from the last four drives of the first half....

    - 4/9, 39 yards, INT, seven yard sack
    - 4 rushes for 24 yards (Johnathan Gray had a eight yard rush and a seven-yard rush, David Ash had an eight-yard rush, Joe Bergeron had a one-yard rush)
    - Texas had a fifteen yard hands to the face penalty.

    Once again, I don't know why we were not more diverse on offense and didn't spread around our touches. Johnathan Gray was obviously was doing well in the first half (four rushes for fifty-one yards) and he has a skill-set most similar to the tri.

    Also, it seems like Joe Bergeron was involved in the rushing game in the most predictable situations. All season, Joe Bergeron has been the red zone back, as well as a first and second-down back. He had four rushes for twelve yards in the first half-- two rushes for five combined yards on first down and two red zone rushes.

    Offensive numbers, or lack of numbers, since the OSU game....

    D.J. Monroe has three rushes for seventeen yards (2 for 6 v.Baylor) in the last four games. He had eleven rushes for 80 yards and two receptions for 18 yards in the first four games.

    Marquise Goodwin did not have a touch against Oklahoma. He had 12 receptions for 194 yards and two touchdowns in the first four games. He has only 7 receptions for 51 yards in the last four games. Three of his eight rushes have been in the last four games. (3 for 27 yards v.Baylor, 4 for 24 yards and a one yard rush v.West Virginia, 2 for 52 rushing and a TD v.Kansas).

    Daje Johnson had eleven receptions in the first four games of the season. He has only three receptions in the last four games.

    The 'normals' and a standout...

    By 'normals' I mean the guys that you know will show up and have a good showing on defense.

    Alex Okafor - 11 solo tackles/2 assist, TFL, FF, 3 QB hurries
    Kenny Vaccao - 8 solo/3 assist, TFL, FF
    Quandre Diggs - 4 solo/2 assist, 2TFL, 13-yd sack

    The standout to me on defense was Ashton Dorsey. This was more so because of his consistency, but he also had a few flashes. He had two tackles for loss and was in on four combined tackles. What I noticed is that he was the one constant when Texas was stopping the run. Malcom Brown did his job when he came in the second quarter and helped stopped the run on the final drives, but the man who was out there leading the defensive tackles in the second half was Aston Dorsey. Texas went with Desmond Jackson alongside Dorsey on the first and third drives of the second half, and Brandon Moore in with Dorsey on the second drive of the half.

    I am also very interested in seeing if Alex Okafor will line up in different areas of the field like he did against Kansas. He did almost everything. At times he was playing linebacker, bumping down a yard inside and switching sides of the line.

    Despite an embarrassing failure on a fourth down conversion and an interception deep in Kansas territory, Texas won the red zone battle, barely and sort of.

    Texas was 3/5 (60%; 60% TD) in the red zone with three touchdowns.
    Kansas was 3/4 (75%; 50% TD) in the red zone with two touchdowns and a field goal

    Mike Davis ran to engage his man 16 yards downfield, he did just enough to occupy his man and allaow Marquise to run past him. M.J. McFarland also engaged his man enough at the line of scrimmage to allow Marquise to get to the edge and get upfield.

    On Marquise's touchdown run, Joe Bergeron did a great job selling the fake handoff and drawing the linebackers to him. Mike Davis had a block which wasnt anything special, but got the job done and allowed Marquise to get in the end zone untouched. Ryan Roberson really hustled to get from outside of the opposite hash marks to find the field side corner and make his block.

    This post was edited by Mbutler 18 months ago

    signature image signature image

Already have an account? Sign In